Primewell Valera Touring II Review

Primewell Valera Touring II Review

  • Dry 75%
  • Wet 70%
  • Snow 65%
  • Comfort 80%
  • Noise 70%
  • Treadwear 75%
  • Overall 74%
The Primewell Valera Touring II is an all-season tire that offers advanced features for a lower price. The Valera Touring II is probably one of the most economical and affordable choices for an all-season tire that doesn’t have a Chinese badge. This tire is also backed by an impressive 50,000-mile limited warranty and is specifically designed to fulfill the needs of compact cars and small crossovers.

I find it hard to believe that a complete set of four Primewell Valera Touring II tires will only start at less than $200. I am hoping the price is not an indication of the quality and performance of the Valera Touring II since other Chinese-made tires (with a funny name) might cost a bit more.

For this review of the Primewell Valera Touring II, I was able to acquire a 2010 Toyota RAV 4 with the 3.5-liter V6 motor and 5-speed automatic transmission. I’ve always felt the four-banger was inadequate for the task at hand since the V6 engine of the RAV 4 is more powerful, much smoother, and has better fuel economy on the highway. However, my test car has obviously seen better days. I’m just thankful the engine and the suspension is in great shape, save for some squeaking noises in the rear.

The owner of the RAV 4 was kind enough to lend me the car for an entire day. The CUV was fitted with stock 17-inch wheels wrapped in relatively fresh Primewell Valera Touring II tires.

Primewell Valera Touring II Review: Features

The Primewell Valera Touring II is an all-season touring tire designed for driving comfort. If you have sporty apprehensions when choosing a tire, you better look elsewhere. This tire is ideal for bone stock compact cars and CUVs that demand nothing much than all-season driving comfort and low tread wear.

The tire is equipped with a series of circumferential and lateral grooves with multiple sipes to provide good traction on dry, wet, and mild snowy roads. The tire shoulders are equipped with stable pattern blocks and transverse grooves to improve the handling and responsiveness of your vehicle.

The variable-pitch tread design is responsible for the hushed and comfortable ride. Finally, the Valera Touring II is manufactured using an advanced tread compound that offers good all-weather traction with lower tread wear.

Primewell Valera Touring II Review: Test Drive

I always start with a fresh mindset whenever I’m testing tires. There is no use comparing a touring tire with the grip and handling capabilities of an ultra-high performance summer tire. I also consider the capabilities of the automobile. It is foolish to expect magnificent handling from a family-oriented SUV. My neutral mindset allows me to test the tire in its natural element.

Dry Traction

The Primewell Valera Touring II has good traction on dry roads. The tires were also calm and composed at higher speeds. Straight-line driving feels normal, but everything changes if you start to drive aggressively. Even with larger and wider 17-inch wheels, I can feel the front tires squirm for grip if you push the RAV 4 hard in a corner. I guess this has something to do with the heavier and bulkier V6 engine, but the tires are obviously not designed for performance driving. Drive it like a saint, however, and you’re going to be okay.

Wet Traction

Traction on wet roads is admirable, but it’s not stellar by any means. The Primewell Valera Touring II remained composed as I drove the RAV 4 over water puddles filled with wet sand and dirt. I felt a sense of nervousness from the steering and rear wheels as I sped on the wet highway, but it wasn’t much to complain about since I was traveling at a higher speed that time.

Snow Traction

Snow traction was average at best. The Primewell Valera Touring II were able to deliver confidence as I drove over wet and icy roads. The owner told me the tires are adequate for light winter driving, but it is best to avoid roads that are completely covered in snow. I think that’s fair enough given the low price of the tires.

Comfort

Comfort is primarily the strongest asset of the Primewell Valera Touring II. After all, it is a proper touring tire designed for highway driving. The RAV 4 rolled smoothly on the freeway and remained composed even on sections that were covered in harsh concrete. Driving the RAV 4 in the city was also a revelation as the tires remained comfortable even as the roads turned from bad to worst.

Noise

This is where things get a bit confusing. The Primewell Valera Touring II tires were silent at low speeds. Tire roar was more evident as the speed rises. In short, the tires were comfy and silent at low speeds, but there is a bit more road noise as you cruise on the highway. I don’t mind a bit of road noise since I am not driving a Bentley or Rolls Royce, but if you’re a stickler for this kind of stuff, you will probably be disappointed.

Treadwear

Touring tires are generally very good in terms of low tread wear, and the same can be said for the Primewell Valera Touring II. The tires fitted to my test car were still fresh and were only about a couple of months old and the treads were still properly thick with minimal signs of wear. This is good news especially if you consider the low price of the tires.

Conclusion

I honestly think the Primewell Valera II is a solid choice for a cheap touring tire. If you’re the type of driver who doesn’t mind about sporty performance in a set of tires then the Valera Touring II should be included in your shortlist.

But for what it’s worth, the road noise is a bit of an issue since touring tires are supposed to be hushed on the highway. There are better touring tires for the money, but I bet only a few of them can go head-to-head with the Primewell Valera Touring II in terms of price.

Primewell Valera Sport AS Review

Primewell Valera Sport AS Review

  • Dry 80%
  • Wet 70%
  • Snow 65%
  • Comfort 85%
  • Noise 70%
  • Treadwear 70%
  • Overall 74%
The Primewell Valera Sport AS is an all-season ultra-high performance tire that comes with a friendly and affordable price tag. This is one of the newest tires in Primewell’s lineup and is designed to meet the sporting demands of sports coupes and sporting sedans.

Other ultra-high performance tires will cost you an arm and a leg, but not the Valera Sport AS. I’ve been testing tires for a long time, and I always know that cheap tires will have certain compromises in road noise, wet handling, or tread wear.

With that being said, my test car for this Primewell Valera Sport AS review is a 2015 Honda Civic SI sedan. It is equipped with a slightly more powerful 1.8-liter four-cylinder motor and 17-inch aftermarket wheels. The tires fitted were the Primewell Valera Sport AS and were purchased a couple of months ago.

The owner of the Civic bought the tires simply because they cost less than other brands. He had no intentions of buying Chinese tires that are flooding the market these days since he wanted something with a bit more brand credibility. The owner also had a first-generation Honda CR-V that were fitted with Primewell tires so he is entirely familiar with the Primewell brand.

Primewell Valera Sport AS review: Features

Unlike other ultra-high performance tires with an asymmetrical tread design, the Primewell Valera Sport AS is equipped with a directional tread pattern. The grooves are designed to maximize wet driving performance to deliver excellent all-season traction.

The tire is also equipped with four wide longitudinal grooves to enhance water evacuation from the treads. The all-season compound is formulated for improved traction and grip in all-season driving while enhancing the wear characteristics of the tire.

Is the Primewell Valera Sport AS a good choice for sporting coupes and sedans? Can it deliver a higher level of performance without sacrificing comfort and treadwear? Those were the questions in my mind as I drove off to test the tires.

Primewell Valera Sport AS review: Test Drive

My initial impressions of the Primewell Valera Sport AS was the tires were comfortable in both city and highway driving. I did feel the sidewalls were a bit soft compared to other ultra-high performance tires and this gave the steering a rather dull feel.

Dry Traction

Traction on dry roads was good, but it wasn’t great either. I accelerated hard and the tires launched the car fairly well. But as soon as the corners piled up, I felt the tires were skipping a beat, especially as I was traversing over sandy tarmac. But all of this happened only at higher speeds. I also felt the tires were losing a bit of traction if you make abrupt changes to the steering.

Wet Traction

It’s the same story as in the dry. The tires felt okay on wet roads, but it didn’t exactly give me the confidence that I was expecting. Again, the rear tires began to slide as I attacked a corner at moderate speeds on wet roads. I was expecting a bit more traction and grip since the Valera AS is marketed as an ultra-high performance derivative.

Snow Traction

I was able to test the Primewell Valera AS tires on a bit of icy road. The car felt stable, and I didn’t feel the tires hunting for traction. But it is foolish to expect these tires to perform admirably in light to moderate snow. For what it’s worth, the Valera AS tires were surprisingly behaved on icy or snowy roads as long as you maintain average speeds.

Comfort

I was also a bit surprised when it comes to the driving comfort. The Honda Civic SI is far from being a luxury car, but the Primewell Valera AS tires fitted to my test car were decently comfortable despite the low-profile configuration. I guess this has something to do with the soft sidewalls of the tires, which also explains why the steering feels a bit lifeless as slow to moderate speeds. However, you can traverse over concrete expansion joints and rough patches of tarmac with nary a complaint. Weirdly enough, the Valera AS felt like a touring tire in terms of comfort. Whether that’s good or bad, I guess it will all depend on the owner of the car.

Noise

Road noise and tire roar was relative to the speed of the vehicle. The Primewell Valera AS tires were surprisingly quiet and docile at average speeds, but the tire roar piles up as you approach the upper reaches of the speedometer. This is not exactly an issue if you do most of your driving in the city. But if your car is a certified highway cruiser, you can find tires that are a bit quieter than the Valera AS.

Treadwear

The Primwell Valera AS tires fitted to my test car were still relatively new, but I have to admit that there were already visible signs of wear. I guess this is par for the course since cheaper tires have a tendency to wear quicker than a more expensive set. The tread wear is not that bad, but considering the age of the tires fitted to my test car and the amount of miles accumulated so far (which is around 1,500 miles), I was expecting the treads to be fresh as a daisy.

Conclusion

In my opinion, the Primewell Valera AS is a good choice, although I wish it had been better. The tires had good traction on dry and wet roads, and they were decently comfy as well. But if the tires had a bit more traction in the dry and had less road noise, it would have gotten a higher score.

For the price, it is hard to argue with the Primwell Valera AS. It is still a solid choice if you are looking for an ultra-high performance tire with a price that won’t break the bank.

Primewell Valera H/T Review

Primewell Valera H/T Review

  • Dry 75%
  • Wet 70%
  • Snow 60%
  • Comfort 85%
  • Noise 70%
  • Treadwear 75%
  • Overall 74%
I had a hard time searching for a test car fitted with the Primewell Valera H/T tires for this review. However, as luck would have it, my cousin’s neighbor was selling their 2013 Honda CR-V LX. I was interested at first, so I headed down there and gave it a go. The CR-V was in mint condition, but the paint job was a dreary silver hue. I started to lose interest in the car, but that was before the tires caught my eye.

Lo and behold! The CR-V was fitted with Primewell Valera H/T tires! I figured the car was perfect for my test drive, so I informed the owner that I was going to test the car and review the tires. In return, I promised to find them a buyer that is willing to give their CR-V a new home.

The owner of the 2013 CR-V was a lanky guy in his early 50s and had with silver-gray hair, which is strangely the same hue as the paint in his Honda. He had the Primewell Valera H/T tires fitted more than 5 months ago. He chose the Primewell brand mainly due to the low price since he was planning to sell the car in a couple of months to make room for a new RAM pickup truck.

We shook hands and off I went. I also promised to fill the CR-V with gas as a gesture for his kindness. I went to the nearest gas station and prepared to test the Primewell Valera H/T tires by checking the air pressure. It was a nice day and the sun was out. This is going to be a great review.

Primewell Valera H/T review: Features

The Primewell Valera H/T tires are not designed for sporty driving. These are all-season tires with a tread design that is tuned for quiet, comfortable, and silent highway driving. The Primewell Valera H/T is equipped with a symmetrical tread design with four circumferential ribs. This design will ensure excellent handling and a smooth ride.

The tread block design is also designed with active noise canceling technology to deliver silent performance in all types of roads. The open slotted shoulder design will also ensure great handling in both wet and dry roads.

The Primewell Valera H/T is applicable to small and midsize crossovers, sport-utility vehicles, and 4x4 pickup trucks. It is sold in 15” to 20” diameters.

Primewell Valera H/T review: Test Drive

My 2013 Honda CR-V is the LX model equipped with AWD and a five-speed automatic transmission. The Primewell Valera H/T tires were not what you would call brand new since there were already signs of wear on all four tires. The owner specifically told me that his only complaint about the tires were the rapid tread wear. The CR-V has accumulated about 4,200 miles since the tires were replaced.

Dry Traction

I have nothing bad to say about the dry performance of the Primewell Valera H/T, but it seems the traction is proportional to how fast you’re going. At slow or moderate highway speeds, dry traction was excellent. But if you push it to the upper reaches of the speed limit, I felt a slight loss of traction and steering feel. It is basically the same in the wet.

But who am I to complain? If I was looking for high-speed traction and stability, why would I install a set of highway terrain all-season tires like the Primewell Valera H/T?

Wet Traction

Like I previously mentioned above, traction in the wet is proportional to the speed the vehicle is traveling. The Primewell Valera H/T tires offered adequate amounts of grip on wet roads, but only at slow or moderate speeds. If you push the car past the speed limit, you will need to grasp the steering wheel with both hands.

Snow Traction

I had no chance to test the Primewell Valera H/T tires in the snow, but the owner told me the tires were fine as long as you’re not driving on roads covered with more than two inches of snow. The open slotted shoulder design of the Primewell Valera H/T gave it the ability to travel over icy or snow-covered roads, but don’t expect the tires to perform similarly to proper snow tires.

Comfort

When it comes to driving comfort, it is hard to fault the Primewell Valera H/T. The ride remained supple and comfortable even on poorly-maintained city roads. Highway driving was a revelation as the Primewell Valera H/T tires were in their true element as long as you pay attention to the speed limit.

Noise

The Primewell Valera H/T tires are one of the most affordable highway terrain tires that you can buy. But relatively cheap tires have one thing in common: excessive road noise and poor tread wear. In this regard, the Primewell Valera H/T tires fitted to my test car were not what you would call hushed or silent. Road noise was more evident as you approached highway speeds, but the tires were thankfully a bit more silent if you drive at slow or average speeds.

Treadwear

The Primwell Valera H/T in my test car were fading a bit faster than the usual. It’s nothing bad, but cheap tires do have a tendency to wear quicker than the more expensive variety. But the logic here is you can basically buy 2 sets of Valera H/T tires and still pay less money if you were to purchase a more expensive set of rollers.

Conclusion

The Primewell Valera H/T is a good choice for daily driven crossovers and SUVs. It is not the best tire when it comes to road noise and treadwear but it makes for it in terms of comfort and all-season handling. For the price, I can see no reason why you shouldn’t try a set of Primewell Valera H/T for your crossover or SUV.

Primewell Valera AT Review

Primewell Valera AT Review

  • Dry 85%
  • Wet 80%
  • Snow 85%
  • Comfort 80%
  • Noise 75%
  • Treadwear 75%
  • Overall 80%
All-terrain tires are generally regarded as expensive. But not the Primewell Valera AT. The Valera AT is an all-terrain and all-season tire designed for rugged 4x4 vehicles and SUVs. This is the type of tire that will give your vehicle go-anywhere capabilities. If you want to upgrade the looks and off-road prowess of your truck or SUV, the Primewell Valera AT is a good choice.

First, let’s talk about the price. You can buy a set of 5 Primewell Valera AT tires (one for the spare tire) while still paying less money if you would buy 4 pieces of all-terrain tires from other known brands. That’s how cheap the tires are.

Next, let’s talk about the looks or tread design. The large longitudinal and shoulder blocks are primed for action. The tires are practically screaming for action! It is only fitting that I got myself a 2010 Toyota FJ Cruiser fitted with a 2.5-inch lift kit, aftermarket 18-inch wheels, and Primewell Valera AT tires.

But is this tire all about the looks? Does it look good to cover up some minor imperfections on the side? These are the questions in my mind as I prepared for this review of the Primewell Valera AT tires.

Primewell Valera AT review: Features

The Primewell Valera AT is engineered with five longitudinal blocks that are designed to deliver maximum traction on any type of road surface, including deep or moderate snow. The tire is also equipped with a unique shoulder block design that works like a shovel as you move forward. This design is responsible for the traction and grip when driving over mud or icy slush.

Take a closer look that the grooves of the tires. You will notice that the grooves have a 3D chamfered design that enables the tire to eject stones and debris on the tread. This feature will ensure that the tires maintain traction while also improving the durability of the rubber.

You know the Primewell Valera AT is cheap, and you already know it is fitted with an aggressive and good-looking tread design. But how does it behave on the road?

Primewell Valera AT review: Test Drive

I’m not a big fan of the FJ Cruiser. But then again, I’m not a fan of off-road driving either. I simply find the FJ Cruiser to be too pretentious for its own good. My colleagues are quick to point out the FJ Cruiser is a capable off-road machine despite behaving like a boat on normal roads. But if I were to go off-roading, I would probably take with me a Jeep Wrangler or a Toyota Land Cruiser.

In the flesh, the FJ Cruiser looks more aggressive, especially in off-road configuration. The lift kit definitely gave the truck some character while the chunky wheels and off-road tires added a rugged appeal to my test car.

Dry Traction

So far, so good. The Primewell Valera AT tires had exceptional amounts of dry traction. I drove on the highway and the tires were surprisingly refined, but more on this later. I also drove on a moderately challenging off-road trail, and the tires never skipped a bit, even on loose gravel peppered with sand and loose dirt.

Wet Traction

The Primewell Valera AT offered huge dollops of grip on wet roads. I never felt the SUV loose traction even as I pushed hard on the gas pedal on a wet highway. The tires simply gave me a feeling of confidence even if my test car had a tendency to wallow and float at moderately higher speeds. I also tested the tires on wet mud and my truck simply drove over the thick slush like it was never there.

Snow Traction

The Primewell Valera AT tires felt exceptionally good as I tested the tires in the snow. Icy roads and slush were no match for the capabilities of the Valera AT. I went as far as testing the tires in deep snow (which was around 3 inches) and the tires never skipped a beat. By this time, I was loving the FJ Cruiser more and the tires were proving that they are worth more than the price.

Comfort

The FJ Cruiser is not the most comfortable SUV I have ever driven, especially with the aggressive lift kit installed. However, I have nothing bad to say about the ride comfort as the SUV felt pretty decent on all types of road conditions. The owner of the FJ Cruiser told me the Primewell Valera AT was a big upgrade in overall ride comfort over his old set of all-terrain tires. This has something to do with the large and solid tread blocks that act like shock absorbers as the tire rolls on the road.

Noise

The same holds true for the road noise. The owner of the FJ Cruiser said the tires are also quieter and more refined than his old set of rubber. This is high praise for an all-terrain tire since these types of tires are not known for their comfort and ride silence. But if you push it on the highway, you will notice a bit more tire roar, which is what I expected given the aggressive nature of the tires.

Treadwear

The treadwear characteristics of the Primewell Valera AT is on the average side of the spectrum. The tires on my FJ Cruiser were approximately 6 months old and have traveled an average of 8,000 miles. I noticed signs of wear on all four tires, but I think this is par for the course. Primewell tires are notorious for less-than-favorable treadwear, but I am happy to report the Valera AT tires on my test vehicle were holding up pretty well.

Conclusion

It’s great to know you don’t need to fork over a huge amount of cash for a quality set of all-terrain tires. You should check out the Primewell Valera AT if you want a cheap, dependable, refined, and great looking set of all-terrain rubber.

Primewell PS830/850 Review

Primewell PS830/850 Review

  • Dry 60%
  • Wet 55%
  • Snow 50%
  • Comfort 75%
  • Noise 60%
  • Treadwear 55%
  • Overall 59%
There is a lot of confusion regarding the differences between the Primewell PS830 and PS850 touring tires. Both tires are basically the same since they have the same symmetrical tread design (although the PS850 has a more aggressive set of treads), and both tires are classified as all-season touring tires.

According to Primewell’s official website, the PS830 and PS850 was replaced by the new PS880 and PS870. The Primewell PS880 is a high-performance summer tire while the PS870 is a standard performance summer tire.

This review will focus on the Primewell PS830. I was lucky enough to obtain a 2014 Chevrolet Sonic LS hatchback with the 1.8-liter motor and 6-speed automatic transmission. My test vehicle was fitted with stock 15-inch wheels and Primewell PS830 tires. I think this is a good match for the naturally-aspirated motor of my test car.

The owner of the Chevrolet Sonic is a city dweller. He does most of his driving in the city, and he rarely goes to the highway. If need be, he uses his Toyota 4Runner for those long highway jaunts. He bought the Sonic used 2 years ago and has been his daily driver ever since. The Primewell PS830 tires were almost a year old, and it shows. There were evident signs of wear on all four corners of the vehicle.

Primewell PS830 Review: Features

I have to be honest. I heard a lot of not-so-good things about the Primewell PS830, even before this review. Most of it had something to do with rapid tread wear, road noise, and poor durability. Maybe this is the reason why Primewell redesigned and re-engineered their new line of tires since their old lineup had terrible reviews.

The Primewell PS830 is equipped with four main circumferential grooves with sturdy shoulder blocks. The design is meant to deliver exceptional driving stability and all-weather traction. The Primewell PS830 is an all-season touring tire and offers good traction on wet or icy roads as well. But the most compelling reason for buying the Primewell PS830/PS850 is the price. You can buy a set of four tires for less than $350, and that’s not a bad deal at all.

Primewell PS830 Review: Test Drive

This will be my first time to drive the Chevrolet Sonic in general. I have always thought this car had the looks and appeal of a sporty sub-compact, but the interior was a bit of a letdown as it was filled with cut-rate plastics and materials. The car simply felt cheaper than the price.

But for city driving, this car makes a lot of sense. It was honestly fun to drive and the handling was superb for a small car. But in this review, I simply felt the tires were a big letdown considering the handling prowess of the Sonic. I have more details below.

Dry Traction

Is it that the base naturally aspirated motor is too powerful for the Primewell PS830/PS850 tires? I seriously doubt it. But the tires were squealing for grip as I drove towards a moderately fast corner. There was absolutely no drama, but you can feel the front tires struggling for grip as the steering wheel tugged lightly from left to right.

In hard, straight-line acceleration the tires will squirm for grip at the slightest provocation of sand and dirt on smooth tarmac. But get it up to cruising speed and everything settles down. It is not the best tire in terms of dry traction, but it’s not the worst either.

Wet Traction

Let’s just say that wet traction is okay as long as you don’t push the car to the limit. Like I said, the chassis of the Sonic felt more capable than the tires. The result is the suspension also feels sub-par when the car is hushed, and this is more evident when you’re on a wet highway. As long as you maintain average speeds and avoid any sudden maneuvers on wet roads, you’re going to be fine. But I wish it offered more than this.

Snow Traction

There was no time to test the tires in the snow, but I would honestly stay away from light snow as much as possible if my car was fitted with the Primewell PS830 tires. Since wet traction is a bit sub-par, what would you expect if you were to drive it on snow? I asked the owner about this and he had the same opinion. The car was okay on very light snow, but everything turns to butter once the snow piles up on the road.

Comfort

If there is anything besides the price that the Primewell PS830/PS850 can claim, it would have to be driving comfort. The tires felt comfy on both city streets and smooth highway roads. The tires also silenced the nasty humps and thumps as you drive over nasty expansion joints on concrete roads. The sudden jolt of hitting a pothole was also made bearable courtesy of the PS830 tires.

Noise

Sadly, that’s about it. The Primewell PS830/PS850 tires were noisy on the highway especially at higher than average speeds but were muffled at slow speeds. This is a bit confusing since the tires also emitted a noticeable roar at speeds below 40mph. I have driven cars with cheap tires that were more refined than the Primewell PS830/850.

Treadwear

Considering the Primewell PS830 tires on my test car were almost a year old and were only used in the confines of the city, I can honestly say the wear characteristics of the tires was mediocre at best. There are reports the tires will last for only 14,000 or 15,000 miles before needing to be replaced, which speaks volumes about the wear characteristics of the tires.

Conclusion

If you want a cheap touring tire, you are better off with the newer Primewell PS870 and PS880. The Primewell PS830/PS850 offers good value for money at the expense of handling and driving satisfaction.